Graduate Requirements

Table of Contents

I. Master's Program Accreditation
II. The Accreditation Council
III. Aims and Objectives of the Council
IV. Goal of Master's Program Accreditation
V. Accreditation Criteria
VI. Accreditation Policies
VII. Accreditation Process
VIII. Fair Practices in Education
IX. Policy Statement on Conflict of Interest in the Accrediting Process

I. Master's Program Accreditation
Accreditation may be granted for master’s level academic programs educating students for careers in the field of environmental health science and protection. The programs must provide education and training (knowledge and skills) required by a graduate to function as an environmental health science and protection professional.
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II. The Accreditation Council
The National Environmental Health Association established the National Accreditation Council for Environmental Health Curricula as a separate accrediting body in 1967 after holding several workshops on the education of environmental health professionals. The charge to the Council was to develop and implement a program accrediting undergraduate and graduate programs in the field of environmental health. The name of the Council was changed to the National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council in 1991 to reflect the breadth of the field of practice considered by the Council.

The council is an autonomous incorporated organization that relates to and works closely with the National Environmental Health Association and other relevant organizations. Membership of the Council consists of environmental health professionals elected by members of the Council, and no more than two public members appointed by the Council chair. At least one-half, but not more than two-thirds of the elected Council members are associated with education and training in environmental health science and protection. The remainder of the elected membership includes individuals experienced with private and public sector organizations and companies employing environmental health science and protection professionals. The Council is composed of at least 18 but not more than 21 members. The Council General Chair may appoint ex-officio members and consultants to the Council for special assignments.
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III. Aims and Objectives of the Council
A. Promote a high quality education at the baccalaureate and master’s levels for persons studying environmental health science and protection.

B. Assist and support universities and colleges developing or offering a curriculum in environmental health science and protection, and advising them on curriculum content and faculty qualifications.

C. Promote commonality in coverage of basic concepts of environmental health science and protection education.

D. Promote undergraduate curricula of a quality and content compatible with admission prerequisites of graduate programs in environmental health science and protection.

E. Promote graduate curricula providing advanced level environmental health technical and scientific education and administrative and management concepts and skills.

F. Evaluate academic programs at the baccalaureate and master’s levels in environmental health science and protection using criteria established by the Council.

G. Publish and disseminate a list of the institutions with programs accredited by the Council.
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IV. Goal of Master's Program Accreditation
The goal of accreditation of master’s environmental health science and protection programs is to enhance the education and training of students seeking advanced environmental health research, technical and/or administrative knowledge and skills. The criteria used in the evaluation of master’s programs have been developed through the joint efforts of environmental health science and protection academicians and practitioners.
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V. Accreditation Criteria

A. Mission, Goals, Objectives
A program must have clearly articulated a mission, goals and objectives that are consistent with the goal of accreditation.

B. Curriculum
It is recognized that each institution has its own unique requirements or constraints that may dictate the depth and breadth of a curriculum. The resources at hand, including the availability and qualification of faculty, will determine the areas and the degree of emphasis on specific subjects. The National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council recognizes these factors and expects variation among environmental health curricula. The Council also recognizes that progress toward the development of the "optimum" environmental health curriculum requires the skillful application of imagination and creativity. The Council therefore, welcomes the opportunity to review innovative programs and curricula in environmental health science and protection.

  • The curriculum must be responsive to the mission, goals and objectives of the program.
  • The curriculum must be organized and structured to integrate and sequence its content in an orderly and logical fashion.
  • The curriculum must require attainment of the following competencies:
    • Analytical skills
    • Statistical analysis
    • Research methods
  • Communication skills
    • Written
    • Oral
  • Administrative skills
  • Skills and knowledge of natural sciences including biological sciences, chemistry and other sciences
  • Environmental and public health science knowledge and skills
    • Epidemiology
    • Toxicology
    • General technical knowledge and skills in environmental health science areas such as those listed in Table 1.
    • Specialized technical knowledge and skills in at least one environmental health science area at a graduate level (see Table 1).
  • Risk assessment, risk communications and risk management.

The curriculum must include a culminating experience such as a thesis, portfolio, written exam or professional paper. The culminating written product must be of professional quality appropriate to graduate level education.

C. Faculty
Sufficient full-time equivalent, in conjunction with part-time or adjunct faculty, who are academically and professionally qualified, as required to meet the teaching, research and service obligation of the program.

D. Administration
The institution must have an appropriate and effective mechanism for administering the graduate program in environmental health science and protection. The administration must provide stability and a continuity of support for the program.

E. Resources
The program must have sufficient and appropriate resources to support its educational mission. These resources may include:

  • classrooms
  • laboratories
  • offices
  • equipment
  • supplies
  • support staff
  • library materials

F. Students
The program must clearly delineate sufficient and appropriate student admission, performance, progress and graduation requirements.

G. External Advisory Committee
An external advisory committee to the environmental health science and protection program is recommended.  An environmental health science and protection program can benefit from an active, concerned and knowledgeable advisory committee composed of environmental health science and protection practitioners working with local, state, and federal agencies, businesses and industries.  Such a committee can provide "outside" overview of the environmental health science and protection program and give perspective on breadth, balance and comprehensiveness of the curriculum.  The committee may assist in locating internship opportunities, suggesting and finding outside sources of funding and equipment, and be an advocacy group for the program.

Table 1. Environmental and public health science technical knowledge and skills. (List not intended to be comprehensive.)

  • Air Quality Control (indoor, outdoor)
  • Environmental Health Planning for land use, transportation issues and resource consumption and conservation
  • Environmental Health Law
  • Environmental Management
  • Food/Milk Protection
  • Geographic Information Systems/Global Positioning Systems
  • Global Environmental Issues including global warming, ozone depletion and population issues
  • Hazardous Materials Management
  • Healthful Housing
  • Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Health
  • Injury Prevention
  • Institutional Health
  • Noise Control
  • Radiation Protection (ionizing, non-ionizing)
  • Recreational Area Environmental Health
  • Resource Consumption and Conservation
  • Solid & Hazardous Waste Management
  • Vector Control
  • Wastewater Management
  • Water Supply

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VI. Accreditation Policies

A. An institution seeking program accreditation must be regionally accredited.

B. Students must have graduated from the master’s program before the program will be reviewed.

C. A pre-accreditation consultation is available upon request.

D. An institution will be site-visited after submitting an application, application fee and the Program Evaluation Report (Self-study). All site visit expenses are the responsibility of the institution.

E. The institution will have an opportunity to review the site visitors' report and comment on the accuracy of factual information in the report prior to submission of the report to the Council.

F. The program will be evaluated on the basis of the Self-study and on other documentation or information the applicant has presented to the Council at the time it is under review.

G. Full Accreditation will be granted if the Council concludes that the program meets the expectations as outlined in the criteria.

H. Accreditation may be granted for a maximum period of six years.

I. Conditional accreditation may be granted when major deficiencies in the master’s program prevent it from meeting requirements for full accreditation. Major deficiencies may include, but are not limited to, deficiencies in budget, curriculum, numbers and teaching staff qualifications. Additionally, the institution and the Council must mutually agree upon a timetable for correction of all deficiencies.

J. Conditional accreditation must be upgraded to full accreditation within two years of notification of conditional accreditation or accreditation status will be withdrawn. Extensions may be petitioned.

K. Accreditation will be denied if the submitted material is incomplete or if the program does not provide the education required by a master’s environmental health science and protection professional. An institution that has been denied master’s program accreditation may reapply by submitting a new application and Self-study.

L. An institution may appeal any Council decision following the written appeal procedure available from the Council on request.

M. The Council has a procedure for handling complaints involving an accredited program that are pertinent to the accredited status of the program. A copy of the complaint procedure is available from the Council on request.

N. All accredited programs are required to submit an annual report. Information must include, but is not limited to, data concerning enrollment, number of graduates during the past year, and curricular, faculty, budget, or other changes that may influence a program's accreditation status.

O. The Council must be notified in writing within thirty days of any major changes in the program that may have an impact on the quality or orientation of the program.

P. The Council will inform the institution in writing if considering withdrawal of accreditation and the institution may request a hearing and/or a site visit. All site visit and special hearing expenses are the responsibility of the institution.

Q. The Council may immediately withdraw accreditation if the program no longer meets accreditation criteria, an annual report is not submitted, or major program changes in the program are not reported to the Council.

R. The Council may make one of six decisions relating to accreditation status of environmental health science and protection programs:

  1. Pre-accreditation: Pre-accreditation may be granted to a program that demonstrates reasonable assurance that it will be able to meet the criteria for full accreditation within two years. An acceptable, amended Self-study must be submitted within two years of the Council’s decisions to grant pre-accreditation. At the end of the period of pre-accreditation, the program must apply for full accreditation, or its pre-accreditation will be withdrawn.
  2. Full Accreditation: Full accreditation may be granted to a program when the institution and environmental health science and protection accreditation program are in compliance with the Council’s accreditation criteria and policies, and the program has graduated at least one class. Full accreditation is granted for a period of two to a maximum of six years. Full accreditation status may be granted to programs with non-substantial deficiencies that can be easily corrected and documented within one year.
  3. Conditional Accreditation: The conditional accreditation status is a form of probation. It is granted when deficiencies in the environmental health science and protection program have been identified through the Self-study document, the site visit process, the complaint process, or the annual reporting process. "Deficiencies" are defined as areas of noncompliance with Council accreditation criteria or policies that are serious enough to require a full two years to correct. Conditional accreditation may be granted at the time of initial recognition, during accreditation renewal or during a term of full accreditation when the deficiencies have been identified through annual reports or student complaints. Failure to correct the deficiencies in the program within the agreed upon time frame will cause the accreditation of the program to be withdrawn unless the program can satisfy the requirements for an "extension of accredited status."Conditional accreditation will be granted for no more than two years. When the program corrects the deficiencies, its accreditation status will be upgraded to full accreditation for the completion of the original term of accreditation (in the case of a program whose status was downgraded to "conditional" during a term of full accreditation) or will be upgraded to full accreditation for a period of up to four years (in the case of a program granted "conditional" status at the time of renewal of its accreditation status).
  4. Accreditation Withdrawn: Accreditation will be withdrawn from a fully accredited, pre-accredited, or conditionally accredited program in the following situations: (1) when major problems of compliance with Council accreditation criteria and policies have been identified through the annual report and follow up investigation or through the complaint procedure and follow up investigation; (2) when a pre-accredited program fails to correct deficiencies identified during its two-year period; or (3) when a conditionally accredited program fails to correct the deficiencies identified by the Council within the agreed upon time period. "Major problems of compliance" are defined as: loss of institutional accreditation; loss of program funding; suspension or closing of a program by the institution; or problems requiring more than two years to correct. An institution or program may appeal any decision of the Council following the Council’s appeal procedures. A copy of the appeal procedure is available from the Council upon request. A program that has had its accreditation withdrawn may reapply when the problems have been corrected.
  5. Accreditation Denied: Accreditation will be denied in the cases of a program seeking initial accreditation, pre-accreditation, or renewal of full accreditation that prove to have major problems of compliance with Council accreditation criteria and policies. "Major problems of compliance" are defined as: loss of institutional accreditation; loss of program funding; suspension or closing of a program by the institution; or problems requiring more than two years to correct. An institution or program may appeal any decision of the Council following the Council’s appeal procedures. A copy of the appeal procedure is available from the Council upon request. A program that has been denied accreditation may reapply when the problems have been corrected.
  6. Extension of Accredited Status: An extension may be granted to a fully accredited program for a period of one year when circumstances beyond the control of the environmental health science and protection program prevent the completion of the Self-study document and scheduling of the site visit, or the correction of identified compliance problems within the agreed upon time frame. An extension on the due date of the Self-study document must be requested no later than thirty (30) days after receipt of notice from EHAC of the self-study due date. This notice typically occurs in August the year prior to the end of the current period of accreditation. If a program requests an extension prior to the Annual Meeting of the year before the accreditation expires, the Council will vote on the extension at the meeting. If a program requests an extension after the Annual Meeting, the Board of Directors will vote on the matter, and respond within thirty (30) days.

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VII. Accreditation Process

    The Council will provide advice and assistance through correspondence, telephone conferences, and/or on-site consultation to faculty and administrators who have developed or are considering the development of an environmental health science and protection curriculum.
    The institution must follow the process shown below to have its master’s program in environmental health science and protection be considered for accreditation.
    • The Council will consider accreditation of an environmental health science and protection program, following an annual schedule, upon
      • request by the program administrator,
      • submittal of the Program Self-study with supporting materials, and
      • receipt of application for accreditation fee.
    • At the time of re-accreditation, programs shall survey program graduates and employers via EHAC’s online outcome assessment survey tool. All graduates since the last accreditation shall be in the pool of those to be surveyed. The survey is conducted via a link that is provided by the EHAC office to the Program Director of programs seeking re-accreditation. We ask that the Program Director send the instructions for accessing the survey to graduates. The deadline for graduate and supervisor responses is six months prior to the annual meeting of the EHAC Council which is usually held in June. The exact deadline will be provided in the survey instructions. The survey results will be compiled by the EHAC office. Survey results will be made available to Program Directors before the EHAC annual meeting.The purpose of this survey is to determine how well the curriculum meets the needs of the environmental health profession. The information gathered by an institution through the outcome assessment process will not be used as part of the self-study for re-accreditation purposes for a given institution. The Council will use the compiled information from all institutions undergoing re-accreditation to evaluate and modify the curriculum requirements.
    • A team selected by the Council will conduct a site visit at the institution.
    • The Council will evaluate the application materials and site visit report at its annual Council meeting.
    • The Council will report the results of its deliberations to the Institution in writing.

Details needed to complete this process follow.

A. Schedule of Annual Activity

    The timeline for accreditation or re-accreditation is shown in Table 2.
    The EHAC accreditation cycle begins July 1 and continues through June 30 of the next calendar year (*or the date of EHAC’s annual meeting if later than June 30). A program’s accreditation ends on the last day of the listed operating year. The Accreditation or Re-accreditation process begins at the start of the listed operating year.

Table 2. Timeline for Accreditation or Re-Accreditation

Month Activity Responsible Party
July 1* Accreditation cycle begins
August - September 15 Send re-accreditation reminder letter to the program administrator of those programs with accreditation ending this operating year EHAC Graduate Chair
October 1 Applicants for initial accreditation submit application form and application fee to EHAC Headquarters Program Administrator
December 1 * prior to the Annual meeting Submission of Self-study to all Council members and EHAC Headquarters Program Administrator
Six months* prior to the Annual meeting Submission of Outcomes Assessment Questionnaires to EHAC Headquarters (reaccreditation applicants only) Program Administrator
Five months prior to the Annual meeting Site visit team selection and announcement to program EHAC Graduate Chair
Three to Five months prior to the Annual meeting Site visit Site visit team Coordinator and Program Administrator
Maximum FOUR weeks after site visit Site visit team report submission to Program Administrator for comment Site visit team Coordinator
Maximum TWO weeks after receipt of Site visit team report The Program reviews the report and suggests appropriate corrections of fact. Return report and suggestions to team Coordinator Program Administrator
Maximum TWO weeks after receipt of suggestions for factual corrections Upon return to the Coordinator, appropriate changes will be made and the document distributed to the entire Council, site visit team, EHAC Headquarters and the Program Administrator. Site visit team Coordinator
May-July Presentation of verbal response to site visit report at EHAC annual meeting Program Administrator
May - July Accreditation or Reaccreditation deliberations at EHAC annual meeting EHAC Graduate Chair
FOUR weeks after Annual meeting Written notification of deliberation results to Program Administrator EHAC General Chair

* Specific Date for submission of Self Study and Outcomes Assessment Questionnaires to be detailed in letter from Graduate Chairperson.

B. Self-study

Administrators and faculty of an institution seeking accreditation of an environmental health science program are expected to develop a Program Evaluation Report (also referred to as a "self-study") following the guidelines established by the Council. The Self-study shall be completed and submitted December 1 before the annual meeting in which Council is expected to review accreditation application or renewal.

Self studies are due December 1st. Other important deadlines are provided on the EHAC Calendar and in a letter from the EHAC Office reminding the program administrator of the reaccreditation process or initial accreditation process as appropriate. For programs seeking reaccreditation, failure to comply with the deadline will result in an automatic conditional accreditation and your review will be postponed until the following year. Graduate and undergraduate self-studies are to be separate volumes.

EHAC requests that submit the self-study via electronic mail to the EHAC Office in a PDF format to ehacinfo@aehap.org. You can also mail a flashdrive by the due date to:

EHAC
PO Box 66057
Burien, WA 98166

The EHAC staff will ensure a copy of the document is made available to the EHAC Council and will notify the Council that the self study file is available on the login portion of the EHAC website.

For questions about the guidelines or self-study submission, please contact the EHAC Office or call 206-522-5272.

Self-study Format

Please format your self-study using the Graduate Self Study Checklist.

The outline below is to be followed in preparing the report and the supplementary information to be submitted with the report. The self-study document should be preceded by a Table of Contents. The pages in the main body of the self-study should be numbered sequentially. Each appendix should be numbered and referenced with that number in the body of the self-study.

The self-study must clearly articulate how the program meets the accreditation criteria using the following format:

Introduction

a. Program name

b. Name of the school or college

c. Name of the institution

d. Name of the program administrator or contact person including mailing address, telephone number, fax number, E-mail address

e. Name of the chairperson of the department

f. Name of the dean of the school/college

g. Name of the administrator who is to sign for the institution

h. Statement of institutional philosophy

Official signatures

a. Signature of the environmental health science and protection faculty member directing the program

b. Signature of the authorized official of the institution (dean, vice president or president).

Brief history of the program

Missions, Goals and Objectives

a. The program’s mission, goals and objectives. The objectives must be measurable and provide a baseline for establishing program effectiveness.

b. The performance of the program in meeting its mission, goals and objectives.

Curriculum

a. The methods used for evaluating responsiveness to the mission, goals and objectives. Information needs to be provided on:

  1. The system for routine review of course content and curriculum structure.
  2. The methods for evaluating student accomplishments and knowledge and skills developed.
  3. The methods used by students to evaluate the courses, faculty and program.
  4. The program's effectiveness in meeting the educational objectives.
  5. Projections for future achievement and recommendations for future changes and activities.

b. A curriculum organized and structured to integrate and sequence its content in an orderly and logical fashion.

  1. Curriculum requirements indicating those met within the program and those met outside the program.
  2. The degree requirements.
  3. The syllabus for each course integral to the program of study.

c. A matrix of course requirements (course name, number, credit hours and instructor) linked to accreditation competencies:

  1. Analytical skills – statistical analysis and research methods
  2. Communications skills – written and oral
  3. Administrative skills
  4. Natural sciences – met through admission standards and/or through courses taken during their graduate residency.
  5. Environmental and public health science knowledge and skills – epidemiology, toxicology, general technical knowledge and skills in environmental health science areas such as those listed in Table 1.
  6. Specialized technical knowledge in at least one environmental health science area at a graduate level. (see Table 1)
  7. Risk assessment and risk communication

d. Culminating Experience

  1. Requirements.
  2. List of culminating experiences (theses, portfolios, written exams, professional papers, etc.) for the past two years.
  3. Student thesis and paper titles and authors for the past two years.

Faculty

a. List faculty teaching courses fulfilling accreditation competency requirements indicating if faculty members are full-time or part-time (please put vitae in appendix).

b. List faculty working on research with environmental health science master’s students (please put vitae in appendix).

c. Curriculum vitae (please put vitae in appendix) of program faculty.


Administration

a. The organization of the department and its location within the university hierarchy.

b. The mechanisms providing stability and continuity of administrative support.

Resources

a. The program capacity for graduate students.

b. Identification of physical facilities including classrooms, laboratories, offices.

c. Identification of equipment, supplies, and library materials including internet resources.

d. Identification of support staff.

e. Identification of off-campus resources available to the program.

f. Identification of research or special projects grants.

g. Identification of changes in resources.

Students

a. The admission requirements for the graduate program.

b. The requirements for satisfactory performance in the program.

c. The requirements for satisfactory progress in the program.

d. Credit hour requirements for graduation.

e. Number of students enrolled in the program for the past six years.

f. Number of program graduates in each of the past six years.

g. Employment Data: Please provide descriptive job titles and employer identification for program graduates in the past six years.

List the full name of all graduates for the past six years. Please use this format below for presenting graduate employment/status information. Choose a category that describes their current activity or status and their geographic location. Submit all data for graduates in a form as presented below:

EHAC GRADUATES STATUS REPORT

*For occupations, determine the appropriate category and enter under column E.

ED: In Graduate School  MIL: Military  N/A: Not Available
PI: Private Industry  PU: Public Sector  TRI: Tribe  NP: Non Profit  UN: Unemployed

A.
Self Study Report Yr
B.
Accredited School Name
C.
Student Name
D.
Student Graduation Year
D.
Student
Grad ation Year
Name
of Employer
E.
Emplo-
yment
/Status
Category
G.
Employed in State?
H.
Employed Out of State?


Summary

a. The major strengths of the program.

b. The major weaknesses of the program.

c. The long-term plans or expectations for the program.


Appendices

a. Curriculum vitae

b. Course syllabus

C. Site Visit

  • The site team normally is composed of an environmental health science and protection academician and a practitioner. If undergraduate and graduate curricula offered by an institution are reviewed simultaneously, the survey team will include two academicians, one associated with an undergraduate program and the second with a graduate program, and a practitioner.
  • The purpose of the site visit is to verify information submitted to the Council and to supplement that material with information and comprehensive knowledge of the environmental health science and protection curriculum and the organization and administration of the program. The site visit team explores relationships established by the environmental health science and protection faculty with students, the community and faculty in related programs. A model agenda for a site visit is shown in Table 3. After completing its initial review and as its final activity before leaving the institution, the site visit team again meets with the dean or other appropriate administrators to report on its observations.
  • After leaving the institution, the site visit team prepares a written report detailing its observations and providing recommendations for the enhancement of the program with respect to accreditation guidelines. The environmental health science and protection program administrator will have an opportunity to review the site visit team report for accuracy before it is submitted to the Council.
  • At the next annual meeting, the site visit team will report its findings to the Council. Representatives of the institution are strongly encouraged to attend this meeting and be available to respond to questions. Closed sessions of the Council relevant to a specific program are treated as confidential information. Self-study reports and site team reports are public documents available for review.

For further information about the site team visit and report process, please refer to the Council’s policy documents, which are available from the Council’s web site at www.ehacoffice.org

D. Schedule of Fees

  1. Application for Initial Accreditation, one time only: $500
  2. Application for Initial Accreditation second program, one time: $300
  3. Application for Reaccreditation (each program): $250
  4. Site-Visitor Expenses: Actual and reasonable
  5. Annual Accreditation Fee (For one program): $1,150
  6. Annual Accreditation Fee (For two programs) Both an accredited undergraduate and graduate program: $1,1380

Table 3. Model Agenda for Site Visit

Activities Approximate
Time
Needed
First Day
1. Program administrator conference 1 hour
2. University administrator conferences 1 hour
3. College and Department administrator conferences 1 hour
4. Environmental Health Science and Protection faculty conferences 1 hour
5. Instructors and researchers involved with meeting accreditation standards conferences 1 hour
6. Tour of facilities and campus 1 hour
7. Attend environmental health science and protection class
or laboratory session to interview students
1 hour
Second Day
2. Review of student and program records 1 hour
3. Individual student interviews 1 hour
4. Local and state environmental health science and protection personnel 1 hour
5. Survey team private conference 2 hours
6. Final conference with administrative personnel 1 hour

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VIII. Fair Practices in Education

    The National Environmental Health Sciences and Protection Accreditation Council expects programs and sponsoring institutions to comply with the following fair practices standards in education.

Announcements

    Announcements and advertising must accurately reflect the program offered; they must not misrepresent or mislead. Fully accredited programs may represent themselves as being fully accredited by the National Environmental Health Sciences and Protection Accreditation Council. Conditionally accredited programs may represent themselves as being conditionally accredited by the National Environmental Health Sciences and Protection Accreditation Council.

Nondiscrimination

    Students and faculty recruitment and student matriculation practices shall be nondiscriminatory with respect to race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap(s), or national origin.

Safety

    The health and safety of students, faculty, and the public associated with students’ educational activities must be adequately safeguarded.

Matriculation

  • The program must be educational and students must use their scheduled time for educational experiences.
  • Student recruitment practices must permit students to exercise free choice of programs.
  • Student and faculty recruitment practices must not be misrepresentative. Over statement of financial rewards must be avoided in order to prevent unrealistic income expectations on the part of graduates.

Financial

  • Costs for students must be reasonable and must be accurately stated and published.
  • Policies and processes for student withdrawal must be fair to the students and to the school. Students must not be encouraged to arrange loans with excessive interest rates or to take out loans, which lead to indebtedness that is excessive in relation to the potential earnings of a program graduate.
  • The program must not assign excessive credit hours to course work to obtain unjustified tuition income.
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IX. Policy Statement on Conflict of Interest in the Accrediting Process

    The National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council defines a conflict of interest in the accrediting process in the following manner:
    No member of the Council shall participate in any Council decision in which the member has a personal interest, either real or perceived.
    To avoid and prevent conflicts of interest, the Council has adopted the following procedures and practices, divided according to the categories of individuals that participate in the accrediting process.


Council Members

  • Council members are required to reveal to the Council the existence of any of the following real or potential conflicts of interest with a program under consideration prior to evaluating the site visit report on that program and/or discussing and voting on the accreditation of that program. When any of the following conflicts exist, the Council member will remove him/herself from the discussion and voting on that program:
    • Council member has a current or previous affiliation with the institution under consideration, including as an administrator, faculty, staff, employee, appointee, or as a current or former candidate for any of the previously mentioned positions.
    • Council member is an employee of, or is in some way affiliated with, an institution or program in geographic proximity to, or in direct competition with, the program/institution under consideration.
    • Council member currently serves, or previously served (during the last three years), as a paid consultant to the institution/program under consideration.
    • Council member is, or was, a student of, or is a graduate of, the institution under consideration.
    • Council member has a member of his/her immediate family with a relationship to the program/institution.
  • Should unforeseen conflicts develop at any time during the period of consideration of a program/institution before the final decision is made, the Council member is required to notify the Chair of the Council.

Site Visitors

  • Site Visitors are required to decline participation in a site visit team when any of the following actual or potential conflicts of interest exist:
    • Individual has a current or previous affiliation with the institution under consideration, including as an administrator, faculty, staff, employee, appointee, or as a current or former candidate for any of the previously mentioned positions.
    • Individual is an employee of, or is in some way affiliated with, an institution or program in geographic proximity of, or in direct competition with, the program/institution under consideration.
    • Individual currently serves or previously served (during the past three years), as a consultant to the institution/program under consideration.
    • Individual is, or was, a student of, or is a graduate of, the institution under consideration.
    • Individual has a member of his/her immediate family with a relationship to the program/institution.
  • Individuals selected for a site visit team will notify the Council within 10 days of actual or potential conflicts of interest with that program/institution so that substitutions can be made in the composition of the team.
  • Should unforeseen conflicts develop during the site visit or before the final decision is made on the accreditation of the particular program, an individual is required to notify the Chair of the Council.

Programs Seeking Accreditation or Renewal of Accreditation

  • Programs seeking accreditation or re-accreditations will have the opportunity to review the composition of the site visit team in order to identify potential or actual conflicts of interest. Programs will be able to challenge the inclusion of a particular individual with probable cause.
  • Programs also have the obligation to identify Council members or site visitors who may have positive relationships with their program that could be deemed as conflicts. Programs also will have the opportunity to identify Council members with potential or actual conflicts of interest. The Council must be notified of these conflicts at least 30 days before the Council meeting at which the Program will be discussed and accreditation approved or denied.
  • The conflict of interest statement was taken in large part from the conflict of interest statement of the Council on Post-Secondary Accreditation.

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